But this description of swing trading is a simplification. In reality, swing trading sits in the middle of the continuum between day trading to trend trading. A day trader will hold a stock anywhere from a few seconds to a few hours but never more than a day; a trend trader examines the long-term fundamental trends of a stock or index and may hold the stock for a few weeks or months. Swing traders hold a particular stock for a period of time, generally a few days to two or three weeks, which is between those extremes, and they will trade the stock on the basis of its intra-week or intra-month oscillations between optimism and pessimism.

Solid article breaking down the two main strategies for swing trading. I stumbled on swing trading about 5-6 years ago and didn't even actually know what it was called at the time! For the last 5 years, I've been primarily trading postive reversals using the Swing Low method you describe here. After all, we've been in this amazing bull market for the last 8 years, so why fight the overall trend? One key point I would say is it is important to find a method that fit's your personality. I used attempt swing trades based upon breakouts. I found that I feared missing out on a large move, so I would pile into a trade with little thought about the risk vs. reward. I would chase prices higher. I also chased different trading methods, jumping from one to another. Long story short...it didn't work. :-) I described after much trial & error, I finally settled on a trading method that fit my personality. I have found that as a trader, you answer to yourself. Find a trading met


The Gap & Go! is one of those Intraday Trading Strategies that capitalises on the gappers. Gappers are the securities that show a gap between the prices on a chart-when there is an upward or downward movement in the price with no trading in between. Gaps can be created by various factors like earnings announcements, any other type of news releases or a change in the outlook of the analysts.
Based on particular setups, any trading system can be used for the purposes of scalping. In this regard, scalping can be seen as a kind of risk management method. Basically, any trade can be turned into a scalp by taking a profit near the 1:1 risk/reward ratio. This means that the size of the profit taken equals the size of a stop dictated by the setup. If, for instance, a trader enters his or her position for a scalp trade at $20 with an initial stop at $19.90, the risk is 10 cents. This means a 1:1 risk/reward ratio will be reached at $20.10.
Solid article breaking down the two main strategies for swing trading. I stumbled on swing trading about 5-6 years ago and didn't even actually know what it was called at the time! For the last 5 years, I've been primarily trading postive reversals using the Swing Low method you describe here. After all, we've been in this amazing bull market for the last 8 years, so why fight the overall trend? One key point I would say is it is important to find a method that fit's your personality. I used attempt swing trades based upon breakouts. I found that I feared missing out on a large move, so I would pile into a trade with little thought about the risk vs. reward. I would chase prices higher. I also chased different trading methods, jumping from one to another. Long story short...it didn't work. :-) I described after much trial & error, I finally settled on a trading method that fit my personality. I have found that as a trader, you answer to yourself. Find a trading met
Day trading is making short-term trades, lasting less than one day, in an attempt to extract a profit from the financial markets. Some day traders are very active, making many trades each day, while other traders may only make one or two trades per day. The most common day trading markets are stocks, forex and futures. Day trading can be a part-time or full-time career, depending on the trader's style.
But there is an added risk with the shorter time frame. A wide spread between the bid, the ask and commissions can eat too large a portion of your profits. Swing traders can struggle with this too, but the effect is amplified for the day trader. Day traders can find themselves doing all the work, and the market makers and brokers reap the benefits.
Financial settlement periods used to be much longer: Before the early 1990s at the London Stock Exchange, for example, stock could be paid for up to 10 working days after it was bought, allowing traders to buy (or sell) shares at the beginning of a settlement period only to sell (or buy) them before the end of the period hoping for a rise in price. This activity was identical to modern day trading, but for the longer duration of the settlement period. But today, to reduce market risk, the settlement period is typically two working days. Reducing the settlement period reduces the likelihood of default, but was impossible before the advent of electronic ownership transfer.
Successful traders have to move fast, but they don't have to think fast. Why? Because they've developed a trading strategy in advance, along with the discipline to stick to that strategy. It is important to follow your formula closely rather than try to chase profits. Don't let your emotions get the best of you and abandon your strategy. There's a mantra among day traders: "Plan your trade and trade your plan."
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