Day trading is normally done by using trading strategies to capitalise on small price movements in high-liquidity stocks or currencies. The purpose of DayTrading.com is to give you an overview of day trading basics and what it takes for you to make it as a day trader. From scalping a few pips profit in minutes on a forex trade, to trading news events on stocks or indices – we explain how.
When it comes to intraday trading, daily charts are the most commonly used charts that represent the price movements on a one-day interval. These charts are a popular intraday trading technique and help illustrate the movement of the prices between the opening bell and closing of the daily trading session. There are several methods in which intraday charts can be used. Know about some of the most commonly used chart.
Day traders generally use margin leverage; in the United States, Regulation T permits an initial maximum leverage of 2:1, but many brokers will permit 4:1 leverage as long as the leverage is reduced to 2:1 or less by the end of the trading day. In the United States, people who make more than 4 day trades per week are termed pattern day traders and are required to maintain $25,000 in equity in their accounts.[1] Since margin interest is typically only charged on overnight balances, the trader may pay no interest fees for the margin benefit, though still running the risk of a margin call. Margin interest rates are usually based on the broker's call.
Swing, or range, trading Traders find a stock that tends to bounce around between a low and a high price, called a "range bound" stock, and they buy when it nears the low and sell when it nears the high. They may also sell short when the stock reaches the high point, trying to profit as the stock falls to the low and then close out the short position.

Liquidity - The liquidity of a market affects the performance of scalping. Each product within the market receives different spread, due to popularity differentials. The more liquid the markets and the products are, the tighter the spreads are. Some scalpers like to trade in a more liquid market since they can move in and out of large positions easily without adverse market impact. Other scalpers like to trade in less liquid markets, which typically have significantly larger bid-ask spreads. Whereas a scalper in a highly liquid market (for example, a market maintaining a one-penny spread) may take 10,000 shares to make a 3 cent gain ($300), a scalper in an illiquid market (for example, a market with a 25 cent spread) may take 500 shares for a 60 cent gain ($300). While there is theoretically more profit potential in a liquid market, it is also a "poker game" with many more professional players which can make it more difficult to anticipate future price action.


Angel Broking Limited (formerly known as Angel Broking Private Limited), Registered Office: G-1, Ackruti Trade Center, Road No. 7, MIDC, Andheri (E), Mumbai - 400 093. Tel: (022) 3083 7700.Fax: (022) 2835 8811, CIN: U67120MH1996PLC101709, SEBI Regn. No.: INZ000161534-BSE Cash/F&O/CD (Member ID: 612), NSE Cash/F&O/CD (Member ID: 12798), MSEI Cash/F&O/CD (Member ID: 10500), MCX Commodity Derivatives (Member ID: 12685) and NCDEX Commodity Derivatives (Member ID: 220), CDSL Regn. No.: IN-DP-384-2018, PMS Regn. No.: INP000001546, Research Analyst SEBI Regn. No.: INH000000164, Investment Adviser SEBI Regn. No.: INA000008172, AMFI Regn. No.: ARN–77404, PFRDA Registration No.19092018.Compliance officer: Mr. Rajiv Kejriwal, Tel: (022) 39413940 Email: [email protected]
The key to scalping while using short time frames is to identify price changes before the rest of the market has had the chance to act. You should also be willing to accept very low profit margins—gaining less than 1% on a given action will still usually be in your best interest. Because of this, many scalpers may implement tight stop-loss and stop-limit orders over time.  
Another trading method is known as fading the gap at the open. When the opening price shows a gap from the previous day’s close, taking a position in the opposite direction of the gap is known as fading the gap. For days when there is no news or there are no gaps, early in the morning, day traders will take a view on the general direction of the market. If they expect the market to move up, they would buy securities that exhibit strength when their prices dip.
The most significant benefit of day trading is that positions are not affected by the possibility of negative overnight news that has the potential to impact the price of securities materially. Such news includes vital economic and earnings reports, as well as broker upgrades and downgrades that occur either before the market opens or after the market closes.
There are a variety of methodologies to capitalize on market swings. Some traders prefer to trade after the market has confirmed a change of direction and trade with the developing momentum. Others may choose to enter the market on the long side after the market has dropped to the lower band of its price channel—in other words, buying short-term weakness and selling short-term strength. Both approaches can be profitable if implemented with skill and discipline over time.
When you start day trading you’ll have a host of difficult decisions to make. Should you be using Robinhood? What about day trading on Coinbase? Do you have the right desk setup? Where can you find an excel template? How do you set up a watch list? The meaning of all these questions and much more is explained in detail across the comprehensive pages on this website.
When it comes to intraday trading, daily charts are the most commonly used charts that represent the price movements on a one-day interval. These charts are a popular intraday trading technique and help illustrate the movement of the prices between the opening bell and closing of the daily trading session. There are several methods in which intraday charts can be used. Know about some of the most commonly used chart.
Assess how much capital you're willing to risk on each trade. Many successful day traders risk less than 1% to 2% of their account per trade. If you have a $40,000 trading account and are willing to risk 0.5% of your capital on each trade, your maximum loss per trade is $200 (0.005 x $40,000). Set aside a surplus amount of funds you can trade with and you're prepared to lose. Remember, it may or may not happen.
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