Trending stocks rarely move in a straight line, but instead in a step-like pattern. For example, a stock might go up for several days, followed by a few steps back during the next few days before heading north again. If several of these zig-zag patterns are strung together, and the chart appears to be moving higher with some degree of predictability, the stock is said to be in an uptrend.
Since it is unknown how many days or weeks a pullback or counter trend may last, you should enter a bullish swing trade only after it appears that the stock has resumed the original uptrend. One way this is determined is to isolate the counter trend move. If the stock trades higher than the pullback’s previous day’s high, the swing trader could enter the trade after performing a risk analysis. This possible point of entry is known as the “entry point.” This should be examined against two other price points to assess risk and determine your upside target.

When there are higher low points along with stable high points, this suggests to traders that it is undergoing a period of consolidation. Consolidation usually takes place before a major price swing (which in this case, would be negative). Learning about triangle trading and other geometric trading strategies will make you a much better swing trader.


Day traders generally use margin leverage; in the United States, Regulation T permits an initial maximum leverage of 2:1, but many brokers will permit 4:1 leverage as long as the leverage is reduced to 2:1 or less by the end of the trading day. In the United States, people who make more than 4 day trades per week are termed pattern day traders and are required to maintain $25,000 in equity in their accounts.[1] Since margin interest is typically only charged on overnight balances, the trader may pay no interest fees for the margin benefit, though still running the risk of a margin call. Margin interest rates are usually based on the broker's call.
Different markets require different amounts of capital to day trade. Stocks are popular, but also the most capital intensive. If you want to day trade stocks in the US, the absolute minimum you need is $25,000. And you'll actually need more because you need to keep your balance above $25,000. Starting with $30,000 or more is recommended. The stock market provides up to 4:1 leverage on day trades.
Sincere interviewed professional day trader John Kurisko, Sincere states, Kurisko believes that some of the reversals can be blamed on traders using high-speed computers with black-box algorithms scalping for pennies. “That’s one of the reasons many traders get frustrated with the market. The timing is not like it used to be, and many of the old rules don’t work like before.” [2]
Day trading is speculation in securities, specifically buying and selling financial instruments within the same trading day, such that all positions are closed before the market closes for the trading day. Traders who trade in this capacity with the motive of profit are therefore speculators. The methods of quick trading contrast with the long-term trades underlying buy and hold and value investing strategies. Day traders exit positions before the market closes to avoid unmanageable risks and negative price gaps between one day's close and the next day's price at the open.
Swing trading is one of the most popular forms of active trading, where traders look for intermediate-term opportunities using various forms of technical analysis. If you're interested in swing trading, you should be intimately familiar with technical analysis. Investopedia's Technical Analysis Course provides a comprehensive overview of the subject with over five hours of on-demand video, exercises, and interactive content cover both basic and advanced techniques.
The intraday trading strategy to be used also depends upon the traders’ personal trading styles, along with being dependent on the market conditions. Some traders are very active and do many trades a day, with large position sizes, catching even the small price movements; while there are others who trade only on specific news events or only on tendencies that they have well researched.
By aggressively trading on margin he can produce 5% daily profits on the 100k buying power he will grow their 25k cash at the rate of 20% per day. The risk of course is that he will make a mistake that will cost him everything. Unfortunately, this is the fate of 9 out of 10 traders. The cause of these career ending mistakes is a failure to manage risk.
Some of these approaches require short selling stocks; the trader borrows stock from his broker and sells the borrowed stock, hoping that the price will fall and he will be able to purchase the shares at a lower price, thus keeping the difference as their profit. There are several technical problems with short sales - the broker may not have shares to lend in a specific issue, the broker can call for the return of its shares at any time, and some restrictions are imposed in America by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on short-selling (see uptick rule for details). Some of these restrictions (in particular the uptick rule) don't apply to trades of stocks that are actually shares of an exchange-traded fund (ETF).

The key to scalping while using short time frames is to identify price changes before the rest of the market has had the chance to act. You should also be willing to accept very low profit margins—gaining less than 1% on a given action will still usually be in your best interest. Because of this, many scalpers may implement tight stop-loss and stop-limit orders over time.  
You're probably looking for deals and low prices, but stay away from penny stocks. These stocks are often illiquid, and chances of hitting a jackpot are often bleak. Many stocks trading under $5 a share become de-listed from major stock exchanges and are only tradable over-the-counter (OTC). Unless you see a real opportunity and have done your research, stay clear of these.
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