Many professional money managers and financial advisors shy away from day trading arguing that, in most cases, the reward does not justify the risk. Conversely, those who do day trade insist there is profit to be made. Day trading profitably is possible, but the success rate is inherently lower because of the complexity and necessary risk of day trading in conjunction with the related scams. Moreover, economists and financial practitioners alike argue that over long time periods, active trading strategies tend to underperform a more basic passive index strategy, especially after fees and taxes are taken into account.
Individuals who attempt to day trade without an understanding of market fundamentals often lose money. Technical analysis and chart reading is a good skill for a day trader to have, but without a more in-depth understanding of the market you're in and the assets that exist in that market, charts may be deceiving. Do your due diligence and understand the particular ins and outs of the products you trade.
Solid article breaking down the two main strategies for swing trading. I stumbled on swing trading about 5-6 years ago and didn't even actually know what it was called at the time! For the last 5 years, I've been primarily trading postive reversals using the Swing Low method you describe here. After all, we've been in this amazing bull market for the last 8 years, so why fight the overall trend? One key point I would say is it is important to find a method that fit's your personality. I used attempt swing trades based upon breakouts. I found that I feared missing out on a large move, so I would pile into a trade with little thought about the risk vs. reward. I would chase prices higher. I also chased different trading methods, jumping from one to another. Long story short...it didn't work. :-) I described after much trial & error, I finally settled on a trading method that fit my personality. I have found that as a trader, you answer to yourself. Find a trading met
Take breakouts from consolidations. Prior uptrends are a must. Sideways action that resists giving up much ground is preferred. High Relative Strength Ratings are a key statistic for limiting your universe to the best prospects. And volume gives you confirmation that institutions are accumulating shares. The twist added by swing trading is the timeframe.
Make a plan to trade this strategy in a Simulated Trading account for 1 month to test your skills. Your objects will be to achieve a percentage of success (or accuracy) of at least 60%. You also must maintain a profit loss ratio of at least 1:1 (winners are equal size on average as losers). If you can achieve these statistics, then you are positioned well to trade live. During the 1 month of practice, try to take 6 trades per day.

Suppose a trader employs scalping to profit off price movements for a stock ABC trading for $10. The trader will buy and sell a massive tranche of ABC shares, say 50,000, and sell them during opportune price movements of small amounts. For example, they might choose to buy and sell in price increments of $0.05, making small profits that add up at the end of the day because they are making the purchase and sale in bulk.
As with bullish swing trades, if the reward-to-risk ratio is acceptable, you could enter your trade using a sell-stop limit order. This would result in selling the stock short once it hits your entry point. Selling short is the process of borrowing shares from your online broker and selling them in the open market, with the intention of purchasing the shares back for less cost in the future. An alternative to short selling would be to buy an in-the-money put option. If you choose to use options, you would use a contingent order to buy the put after the stock hit the entry price.
The first EMA (50) should be positioned below the second EMA (100). As with the buy entry points, we wait until the price returns to the EMAs. Additionally, the Stochastic Oscillator is utilised to cross over the 80 level from above. As soon as all the items are in place, you may open a short or sell order without any hesitation. The exact same things occur here. Stop-losses are positioned near 2-3 pips above the last high point of the swing accordingly, and take-profits should remain within 8-12 pips from the entry price.
Day traders are attuned to events that cause short-term market moves. Trading the news is a popular technique. Scheduled announcements such as economic statistics, corporate earnings or interest rates are subject to market expectations and market psychology. Markets react when those expectations are not met or are exceeded, usually with sudden, significant moves, which can benefit day traders.

Retail investors are prone to psychological biases that make day trading difficult. They tend to sell winners too early and hold losers too long, what some call “picking the flowers and watering the weeds.” That’s easy to do when you get a shot of adrenaline for closing out a profitable trade. Investors engage in myopic loss aversion, which renders them too afraid to buy when a stock declines because they fear it might fall further.

Spread trading This high-speed technique tries to profit on temporary changes in sentiment, exploiting the difference in the bid-ask price for a stock, also called a spread. For example, if a buyer’s bid price drops suddenly, the day trader might step in to buy and then try to quickly resell at the stock’s ask price or higher, earning a small “spread” on the transaction.
In parallel to stock trading, starting at the end of the 1990s, several new market maker firms provided foreign exchange and derivative day trading through electronic trading platforms. These allowed day traders to have instant access to decentralised markets such as forex and global markets through derivatives such as contracts for difference. Most of these firms were based in the UK and later in less restrictive jurisdictions, this was in part due to the regulations in the US prohibiting this type of over-the-counter trading. These firms typically provide trading on margin allowing day traders to take large position with relatively small capital, but with the associated increase in risk. The retail foreign exchange trading became popular to day trade due to its liquidity and the 24-hour nature of the market.
The difference between the profit target and the entry point is the approximate reward of the trade. The difference between the entry point and the stop out point is the approximate risk.When determining whether it’s worthwhile to enter a swing trade, consider using two-to-one as a minimum reward-to-risk ratio. Your potential profit should be at least twice as much as your potential loss. If the ratio is higher than that, the trade is considered better; if it’s lower it’s worse.

Unlike a number of day trading strategies where you can have a win/loss ratio of less than 50% and still make money, scalp traders must have a high win/loss ratio. This is due to the fact that losing and winning trades are generally equal in size. The necessity of being right is the primary factor scalp trading is such a challenging method of making money in the market.
The goal of swing trading is to capture a chunk of a potential price move. While some traders seek out volatile stocks with lots of movement, others may prefer more sedate stocks. In either case, swing trading is the process of identifying where an asset's price is likely to move next, entering a position, and then capturing a chunk of the profit from that move.
If the strategy is within your risk limit, then testing begins. Manually go through historical charts to find your entries, noting whether your stop loss or target would have been hit. Paper trade in this way for at least 50 to 100 trades, noting whether the strategy was profitable and if it meets your expectations. If it does, proceed to trading the strategy in a demo account in real time. If it's profitable over the course of two months or more in a simulated environment, proceed with day trading the strategy with real capital. If the strategy isn't profitable, start over.
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