The first key to successful swing trading is picking the right stocks. The best candidates are large-cap stocks, which are among the most actively traded stocks on the major exchanges. In an active market, these stocks will swing between broadly defined high and low extremes, and the swing trader will ride the wave in one direction for a couple of days or weeks only to switch to the opposite side of the trade when the stock reverses direction.


The tick volume is measured by how much the price is has ticked “up” or “down” in that particular candle bar. So the more people are getting in at the time, the longer the volume line will become. This is because there will be more movement in price action with all of those entry orders flying in. So it makes sense that the volume indicator is, first of all, very accurate, and second has no real lag to it. It is currently showing you what the price action is doing the number of “ticks” on that candle bar. This results in the bar looking like this:
Read books and articles on trading. Consider getting mentoring from someone you have followed and who's method you feel would work with your personality and needs. Invest in your own education, not trade signals you pay for each month or expensive subscriptions—these only serve to make you reliant on someone else. Invest in yourself from the start. That way, no matter what happens you have the skills to get the job done, on your own.

You have to see for yourself whether the pros outweigh the cons, and vice-versa. Technological resources can also enhance your trading. To expedite your order placement, with Admiral Markets, you can access an enhanced version of the 1-click trading terminal via MetaTrader 4 Supreme Edition. If you are interested in other strategies, you can check out our Best Forex Trading Strategies That Work article.
Years ago, when stocks were quoted in fractions, there was a standard spread of 1/16 of a dollar or a "teenie". This spread allowed scalp traders to buy a stock at the bid and immediately sell at the ask. Hence the teenie presented clear entry and exit levels for scalp traders. The scalp trading game took a turn for the worst when the market converted to the decimal system. The decimal system closed the "teenie" often times to within 1 penny for high volume stocks. This overnight shifted the strategy for scalp traders. A scalp trader now had to rely more on their instincts, level II, and the time and sales window.

Article copyright 2011 by Alex Elder. Reprinted and adapted from Come Into My Trading Room with permission from John Wiley & Sons, Inc. The statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author. Fidelity Investments® cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any statements or data. This reprint and the materials delivered with it should not be construed as an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy shares of any funds mentioned in this reprint.


If the market is trending down, they would short securities that exhibit weakness when their prices bounce. Most independent day traders have short days, working two to five hours per day. Often they will practice making simulated trades for several months before beginning to make live trades. They track their successes and failures versus the market, aiming to learn by experience.
Based on particular setups, any trading system can be used for the purposes of scalping. In this regard, scalping can be seen as a kind of risk management method. Basically, any trade can be turned into a scalp by taking a profit near the 1:1 risk/reward ratio. This means that the size of the profit taken equals the size of a stop dictated by the setup. If, for instance, a trader enters his or her position for a scalp trade at $20 with an initial stop at $19.90, the risk is 10 cents. This means a 1:1 risk/reward ratio will be reached at $20.10.
It needs sheer dedication, hard work, patience, quick wit and immense knowledge to be successful in intraday trading. Successful intraday trading involves 90% waiting and 10% execution. So, yes, it can make a trader rich in a relatively short period of time if the correct processes are followed, and yes, it is possible to hold on to the profits in the long-term if the correct strategies are followed.
The sheer volume of forex trading makes it attractive for day traders. There are multiple short-term opportunities in a trending currency pair, and an unrivalled level of liquidity to ensure opening and closing trades is quick and slick. More suited to technical analysis, there are other ways to trade foreign exchange. In addition, forex has no central market. This means traders can make trades six days a week, 24 hours a day. They present a great starting point for entry level or aspiring traders with full time jobs. Traders in Australia might be specifically interested in trading the AUD USD pair.
The most significant benefit of intraday trading is that positions are not affected by the possibility of negative overnight news that has the potential to impact the price of securities materially. Such news includes vital economic and earnings reports, as well as broker upgrades and downgrades that occur either before the market opens or after the market closes.
The difference between the profit target and the entry point is the approximate reward of the trade. The difference between the entry point and the stop out point is the approximate risk.When determining whether it’s worthwhile to enter a swing trade, consider using two-to-one as a minimum reward-to-risk ratio. Your potential profit should be at least twice as much as your potential loss. If the ratio is higher than that, the trade is considered better; if it’s lower it’s worse.
Some of these approaches require short selling stocks; the trader borrows stock from his broker and sells the borrowed stock, hoping that the price will fall and he will be able to purchase the shares at a lower price, thus keeping the difference as their profit. There are several technical problems with short sales - the broker may not have shares to lend in a specific issue, the broker can call for the return of its shares at any time, and some restrictions are imposed in America by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on short-selling (see uptick rule for details). Some of these restrictions (in particular the uptick rule) don't apply to trades of stocks that are actually shares of an exchange-traded fund (ETF).
It is important to broaden your understanding of the market. By trying different approaches, you can view your strategies from a new perspective, and gain valuable insight into the inner mechanics of trading. Even if it doesn't work out for you, the risks are very low. The essence of the strategy will not allow for high losses, or high gains for that matter. Make sure you are familiar with risk management, and learn the best-practice risk and trade management for successful Forex and CFD trades.
So, swing traders are not looking to hit the home run with a single trade – they are not concerned with the perfect time to buy a stock exactly at its bottom and sell exactly at its top (or vice versa). In a perfect trading environment, they wait for the stock to hit its baseline and confirm its direction before they make their moves. The story gets more complicated when a stronger uptrend or downtrend is at play: the trader may paradoxically go long when the stock dips below its EMA and wait for the stock to go back up in an uptrend, or he or she may short a stock that has stabbed above the EMA and wait for it to drop if the longer trend is down.

Range trading, or range-bound trading, is a trading style in which stocks are watched that have either been rising off a support price or falling off a resistance price. That is, every time the stock hits a high, it falls back to the low, and vice versa. Such a stock is said to be "trading in a range", which is the opposite of trending.[13] The range trader therefore buys the stock at or near the low price, and sells (and possibly short sells) at the high. A related approach to range trading is looking for moves outside of an established range, called a breakout (price moves up) or a breakdown (price moves down), and assume that once the range has been broken prices will continue in that direction for some time.

Swing trading is one of the most popular forms of active trading, where traders look for intermediate-term opportunities using various forms of technical analysis. If you're interested in swing trading, you should be intimately familiar with technical analysis. Investopedia's Technical Analysis Course provides a comprehensive overview of the subject with over five hours of on-demand video, exercises, and interactive content cover both basic and advanced techniques.


This time around we’re going to outline a simple swing trading strategy. It's similar to what Jesse Livermore used to trade. Let’s review the swing trading strategy Livermore used to help forecast the biggest stock market crash in history. It is the Wall Street crash of 1929, also known as Black Tuesday. Here is another strategy called a weekly trading strategy that will keep you sane.

But this description of swing trading is a simplification. In reality, swing trading sits in the middle of the continuum between day trading to trend trading. A day trader will hold a stock anywhere from a few seconds to a few hours but never more than a day; a trend trader examines the long-term fundamental trends of a stock or index and may hold the stock for a few weeks or months. Swing traders hold a particular stock for a period of time, generally a few days to two or three weeks, which is between those extremes, and they will trade the stock on the basis of its intra-week or intra-month oscillations between optimism and pessimism.
Following the 1987 stock market crash, the SEC adopted "Order Handling Rules" which required market makers to publish their best bid and ask on the NASDAQ.[7] Another reform made was the "Small-order execution system", or "SOES", which required market makers to buy or sell, immediately, small orders (up to 1000 shares) at the market maker's listed bid or ask. The design of the system gave rise to arbitrage by a small group of traders known as the "SOES bandits", who made sizable profits buying and selling small orders to market makers by anticipating price moves before they were reflected in the published inside bid/ask prices. The SOES system ultimately led to trading facilitated by software instead of market makers via ECNs.[8]
Many orders placed by investors and traders begin to execute as soon as the markets open in the morning, which contributes to price volatility. A seasoned player may be able to recognize patterns and pick appropriately to make profits. But for newbies, it may be better just to read the market without making any moves for the first 15 to 20 minutes. The middle hours are usually less volatile, and then movement begins to pick up again toward the closing bell. Though the rush hours offer opportunities, it’s safer for beginners to avoid them at first.
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